Recovering From Ida: 9/03/2021

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This past week, the US saw one of the strongest storms to hit our shores in recorded history. According to USA Today, Ida ranked #5 on the list of strongest hurricanes to hit the US mainland based on windspeed at landfall.

Obviously, there was a lot of damage in the wake of the storm. As I watched the news and followed live updates on Twitter, I saw people almost immediately spring into action, helping one another out and beginning the process of organizing resources for the recovery.

In the heat of the moment, I spent a few hours aggregating as many of the resources as I could into a single page.

The result was the Hurricane Ida Recovery Resources page.

It’s nothing special, just a simple HTML webpage. But hopefully having the information in a single location may help save someone time and effort when trying to get back on their feet.

Based on some of the early analytics I’ve seen, quite a few people have visited the page. My hope is that they found it useful or that it will help someone in the future who may be looking for a single location to find information about who to contact, where to donate, etc.

I suspect recovery from the storm will take years. I plan to leave the site up as long as I can and will add additional resources as I come across them.

Ways you can help:

  1. Spread the Word - If you know anyone who might benefit from the site, please share the resource with them. The link is: https://ida-recovery.netlify.app/

  2. Submit a Resource - If you know of any resources that may be helpful, please send me a message. You can email me directly by replying to this newsletter, or I have created a feedback form that you can fill out with the information. https://forms.gle/Sjo14fBcTGMo2azc8

  3. Write Code - I have made the codebase to the website open source. If you are a developer and know of some additional functionality or would like to make modifications to the site, the GitHub repo is located here: https://github.com/skgriffin/ida-recovery It’s simple HTML, CSS, and Javascript. I made it this way to ensure that the site had a low barrier of entry for anyone wishing to contribute.

Anyways, if you’re interested, I took some time and wrote a post on my website about the project.

Even with all the weather news this week, I did come across some interesting things this week…

Field Notes from the week: